Search results

26 results

Featured image for Episode 16: Writing about Japan’s “Have-Nots”Background image for Episode 16: Writing about Japan’s “Have-Nots”

Episode 16: Writing about Japan’s “Have-Nots”

Tokyo Ueno Station by Yu Miri Check out Episode 16 of the Read Literature podcast. In this episode… Post-bubble Japan. The history of socially-conscious Japanese literature. And Yu Miri’s…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 15: Translating Japanese WomenBackground image for Episode 15: Translating Japanese Women

Episode 15: Translating Japanese Women

The Japanese cover of Convenience Store Woman Check out Episode 15 of the Read Literature podcast. In all our episodes so far, we’ve talked almost exclusively about what…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 14: Banana and the BubbleBackground image for Episode 14: Banana and the Bubble

Episode 14: Banana and the Bubble

“White Fox Mirror” by Yoshimi Okamoto, 1980 (via Ukiyo-e.org) Check out Episode 14 of the Read Literature podcast. In this episode, we’re talking about Japan’s bubble economy of…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 13: Literature of Change in the 1960s—Mishima and OeBackground image for Episode 13: Literature of Change in the 1960s—Mishima and Oe

Episode 13: Literature of Change in the 1960s—Mishima and Oe

“Ukiyo-e Today, No. 7” by Okamoto Ryusei, 1974 (via Ukiyo-e.org) Check out Episode 13 of the Read Literature podcast. Today, we’re talking about the literature of change in…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for 31 Days of Listening and Watching for Women in Translation MonthBackground image for 31 Days of Listening and Watching for Women in Translation Month

31 Days of Listening and Watching for Women in Translation Month

Just in time for August and Women in Translation Month, here’s a list of resources about Japanese women writers for listening and watching. The texts mentioned on this…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 12: Japanese Literature in WWIIBackground image for Episode 12: Japanese Literature in WWII

Episode 12: Japanese Literature in WWII

“Flag Merchant” by Sanzo Wada, 1940 (via Ukiyo-e.org) Check out Episode 12 of the Read Literature podcast. Today we’re talking about the 1930s and 40s in Japan—fascism, World…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 11: The I-Novel, Osamu Dazai, and No Longer HumanBackground image for Episode 11: The I-Novel, Osamu Dazai, and No Longer Human

Episode 11: The I-Novel, Osamu Dazai, and No Longer Human

“Asakusa Park Casino Follies” by Sumio Kawakami, circa 1930 (via Wikimedia Commons) Check out Episode 11 of the Read Japanese Literature podcast. Today, we’re talking about the I-Novel—…

Alison Fincher

Episode 10: Taisho Magazines and Akutagawa’s Vision of Hell

“Woman Holding a Black Cat” by Yumeji Takehisa, circa 1919 (via Wikimedia Commons) Check out Episode 10 of the Read Japanese Literature podcast. The father of the Japanese…

Alison Fincher

Episode 9: Ichiyō Higuchi and Meiji Women Writers

A print of a Meiji-era Japanese woman in Western dress via Wikimedia Commons Coming soon—episode 9 of the Read Japanese Literature podcast. In the last episode, we talked…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 8: Meiji Literature and Japan’s Most Famous Literary CatBackground image for Episode 8: Meiji Literature and Japan’s Most Famous Literary Cat

Episode 8: Meiji Literature and Japan’s Most Famous Literary Cat

In this 1874 print by Kyōsai, Japanese yōkai adapt to the modern era.via the Museum of International Folk Art Coming soon: episode 8 of the Read Japanese Literature…

Alison Fincher

Episode 7: Kaidan—Japan’s Ghost Stories

An image of Okiku, the ghost who inspired The Ring, by Toyohara Kunichika (via Wikimedia Commons) Check out Episode 7 of the Read Japanese Literature podcast. In this…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Audiobooks of Japanese Literature in TranslationBackground image for Audiobooks of Japanese Literature in Translation

Audiobooks of Japanese Literature in Translation

Kobo Abe The Woman in the DunesTranslated by E. Dale SaundersNarrated by Julian Cihi Hiro Arikawa The Traveling Cat ChroniclesTranslated by Philip GabrielNarrated by George Bladden Osamu Dazai…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 6: High and Low Literature in Edo JapanBackground image for Episode 6: High and Low Literature in Edo Japan

Episode 6: High and Low Literature in Edo Japan

Saikaku’s illustration of Yonosuke sailing for the Island of Women. Check out Episode 6 of the Read Japanese Literature podcast. This episode is marked mature. How does “this…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 5: Setsuwa and Medieval Japanese BuddhismBackground image for Episode 5: Setsuwa and Medieval Japanese Buddhism

Episode 5: Setsuwa and Medieval Japanese Buddhism

A 15th century illustration of Kiyohime Check out Episode 5 of the Read Japanese Literature podcast. Enjoy the story of a vengeful would-be lover who turns into a…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Episode 4: Yoshitsune Ballads and Tomoe DramaBackground image for Episode 4: Yoshitsune Ballads and Tomoe Drama

Episode 4: Yoshitsune Ballads and Tomoe Drama

A 19th century woodblock print of Yoshitsune and Benkei fighting with swords via Wikimedia Commons Check out the Read Japanese Literature podcast. We’re talking about two central genres…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Podcast: The Tale of the HeikeBackground image for Podcast: The Tale of the Heike

Podcast: The Tale of the Heike

A 19th century woodblock print of Tomoe from The Mirror of Beauties Past and Present via Wikimedia Commons Check out the Read Japanese Literature podcast. Episode 3: The…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Podcast: The Tale of GenjiBackground image for Podcast: The Tale of Genji

Podcast: The Tale of Genji

Check out the Read Japanese Literature podcast. A 19th-Century Illustration of The Tale of Genji via Wikimedia Commons Episode 2: The Tale of Genji—The world’s oldest novel. A…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for The Kojiki and Japan’s Earliest LiteratureBackground image for The Kojiki and Japan’s Earliest Literature

The Kojiki and Japan’s Earliest Literature

Kobayashi Eitaku, Izanagi and Izanami, c. 1885Via Wikimedia Check out the Read Japanese Literature podcast. Episode 1: The Kojiki—Gods having sex, founding of the imperial dynasty, and some of…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Mudshit: Sacred Cesium Ground as an Allegory for 3/11Background image for Mudshit: Sacred Cesium Ground as an Allegory for 3/11

Mudshit: Sacred Cesium Ground as an Allegory for 3/11

On March 11, 2011, the 9.0-magnitude Great East Japan Earthquake triggered a powerful tsunami that swept the Tohoku region in Northeastern Japan. Residents had less than ten minutes…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Aum AnxietyBackground image for Aum Anxiety

Aum Anxiety

The narrative that most Japanese embrace (or imagine they share) broke down; none of these “common values” proved the least effective in warding off the evil violence that…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for The Goddess Chronicle: A Woman’s Ambiguous Place in Japan’s Creation MythBackground image for The Goddess Chronicle: A Woman’s Ambiguous Place in Japan’s Creation Myth

The Goddess Chronicle: A Woman’s Ambiguous Place in Japan’s Creation Myth

To appreciate The Goddess Chronicle, you need to be familiar with The Kojiki, the oldest recorded mythical origin story of Japan. (Kirino provides a good summary in part II, chapters…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for The Evaporated People in Contemporary Japanese LiteratureBackground image for The Evaporated People in Contemporary Japanese Literature

The Evaporated People in Contemporary Japanese Literature

Each year in Japan, thousands of people disappear. They haven’t been kidnapped. They haven’t been murdered. (Japan has one of the lowest murder rates in the world. An…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for A Regressive Vision of Women’s Happiness: Before the Coffee Gets Cold by Toshikazu KawaguchiBackground image for A Regressive Vision of Women’s Happiness: Before the Coffee Gets Cold by Toshikazu Kawaguchi

A Regressive Vision of Women’s Happiness: Before the Coffee Gets Cold by Toshikazu Kawaguchi

“The number of women aged between 15 and 50 is fixed. Because the number of birth-giving machines and devices is fixed, all we can do is ask them…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for Cannibalism in Two Contemporary Japanese NovelsBackground image for Cannibalism in Two Contemporary Japanese Novels

Cannibalism in Two Contemporary Japanese Novels

Futakuchi-Onna from Ehon Hyaku Monogatari (絵本百物語, “Picture Book of a Hundred Stories”) Like many other countries, Japan has its own body of folklore with cannibalistic monsters. Fo…

Alison Fincher

Featured image for On Female Bonding and Bathing Culture in Contemporary Japanese Women’s WritingBackground image for On Female Bonding and Bathing Culture in Contemporary Japanese Women’s Writing

On Female Bonding and Bathing Culture in Contemporary Japanese Women’s Writing

“The Europeans are compelled to take [a] bath in order to clean off the filth… on the contrary, bathing of the Japanese is far beyond the simple object…

Alison Fincher